Good Listens

The coolest audiobooks we found on Spotify!

In Conversation with an Acid Bath Murderer

 

In 1949, John George Haigh, the infamous 'Vampire killer', was hanged for the murder of at least six people.

 

Join him in the hangman's cell as he tells you his story and invites you to relive the seduction, murder and disposal of three of his victims.

 

Nigel Fairs, whose great-grandfather put the shackles on Haigh in Lewes Prison, plays the charming murderer, with Louise Jameson and Richard Franklin as two of his victims.

The Invisible Man

 

A man dressed in a long coat with bandages covering his face arrives in a small village and does not engage much in conversation. While striving to maintain his privacy, he receives what he calls his luggage, yet in reality is chemicals and laboratory supplies, thereby furthering the mystery around himself. Eventually, he reveals his name to be Griffin and later runs into Mr. Kemp, a former student from medical school. Griffin creates a diabolical plan after recounting to Kemp how he is able to create invisibility. Kemp tries to turn Griffin over to the authorities and Griffin vows to make Kemp the first casualty in his diabolical plan.

Thin Ice

 

The stunning wilds of Alaska are not for the faint of heart―but when Beth Rivers finds herself with a need to disappear, she’s already faced far worse. So how hard could it be?

Notes on Blindness - A Journey Through the Dark

 

Notes on Blindness was the basis for a major documentary in 2016. 'It's a gift. Not a gift I want, but it is a gift' Days before the birth of his first son, writer and academic John M. Hull started to go blind. He would lose his sight entirely, plunged into darkness, unable to distinguish any sense of light or shadow. Isolated and claustrophobic, he sank into a deep depression. Soon, he had forgotten what his wife and daughter looked like. In Notes on Blindness, John reveals his profound sense of loss, his altered perceptions of time and space, of waking and sleeping, love and companionship. With astonishing lucidity of thought and no self-pity, he describes the horror of being faceless, and asks what it truly means to be a husband and father. And eventually, he finds a new way of experiencing the world, of seeing the light despite the darkness.

Murder In the Lincoln White House

 

At the inaugural ball, Lincoln’s trusted entourage is on their guard. Allan Pinkerton, head of the president’s security team, is wary of potential assassins. And Lincoln’s oldest friend, Joshua Speed, is by his side, along with Speed’s nephew, Adam Quinn—called back from the Kansas frontier to serve as the president’s assistant and jack-of-all-trades.

 

Despite the tight security, trouble comes nonetheless. A man is found stabbed to death in a nearby room, only yards from the president. Not wishing to cause alarm, Lincoln dispatches young Quinn—instead of the high-profile Pinkerton—to discreetly investigate.

 

Could the proximity of the murder possibly be a coincidence? Or is the crime directly related to Lincoln himself—possibly a political act? Quinn’s observation skills as a frontier scout are invaluable as he examines the victim and begins a complex investigation. Though he is new to Washington, DC, he must navigate through high society, political personages, and a city preparing for war in order to solve the crime. He finds unexpected allies in a determined female journalist named Sophie Gates, and Dr. Hilton, a free man of color

UnSlut

 

When Emily Lindin was 11 years old, she was branded a "slut" by the rest of her classmates. For the next few years of her life, she was bullied incessantly at school, after school, and online. At the time, Emily didn't feel comfortable confiding in her parents or in the other adults in her life. But she did keep a diary. Slut/UnSlut is adapted from Emily's much-acclaimed blog, "The UnSlut Project", presenting unaltered excerpts from that diary alongside commentary to provide context and perspective.

The Jungle Book 

 

The Jungle Book (1894) is a collection of stories by the English author Rudyard Kipling. Most of the characters are animals such as Shere Khan the tiger and Baloo the bear, though a principal character is the boy or "man-cub" Mowgli, who is raised in the jungle by wolves. The stories are set in a forest in India; one place mentioned repeatedly is "Seonee" (Seoni), in the central state of Madhya Pradesh.